Procedures Workshop

for Students & Residents

Sunday, August 25, 2024 @ POP!

Hilton Orange County/Costa Mesa

The CAFP Procedures Workshop is a hands-on event for students and residents wanting to learn and practice procedures that are used in a variety of primary care settings, including: inpatient, outpatient, urgent care, emergency department, nursing home, FQHCs, wilderness/street medicine environments and more! Since 2014, this workshop has been designed by medical students and family medicine residents for medical students and residents - with goals of helping peers gain the confidence needed to improve patient care and the competencies necessary to graduate. In the student track, participants learn and practice basic procedural skills. In the resident track, the workshop provides training and practice in more advanced procedural techniques.

Explore workshop details in the Student and Resident tabs. View images from previous procedures workshops in the gallery below.

Gallery
Student procedures
Resident procedures

Procedure descriptions & Learning Objectives

In the student track, participants learn and practice basic procedural skills. The 2023 Workshop will feature the following procedures:

POCUS (90 minutes)

Point of Care Ultrasound (POCUS) is increasingly becoming an extension of the physical exam, adding to clinical decision making for family physicians. 

Students will learn and have practice in: 

  • Understanding the basics of ultrasound (probe/transducer, gain/depth, controls, and display)
  • Identifying organs such as the heart, liver, and kidneys
  • Explaining the procedure to patients

SUTURING (45 minutes)

Suturing is an important skill for any family physician. In this workshop, preceptors provide step-by-step guidance on suturing essentials. 

Students will learn and have practice in:  

  • Preparing a sterile field and gathering instruments
  • Identifying proper surgical techniques and suturing types, such as simple interrupted, running, and subcuticular
  • Explaining the procedure to patients, including post-suture care and timeframe for suture removal

PAP (45 minutes)

Family physicians must be trained to care for a variety of women’s health needs, including routine gynecologic procedures such as pap smears. 

Students will learn and have practice in: 

  • Using a speculum and placing the cervix in the appropriate position 
  • Identifying proper instruments and techniques for sample collection and handling
  • Explaining the procedure to patients, including making them feel comfortable

Procedure descriptionS & Learning Objectives

In the resident track, the workshop provides training and practice in more advanced procedural techniques. The 2023 Workshop will feature the following procedures:

POCUS (90 minutes)

Point of Care Ultrasound (POCUS) is increasingly becoming an extension of the physical exam, adding to clinical decision making for family physicians. 

Residents will learn and have practice in: 

  • Reviewing the basics of ultrasound (probe/transducer, gain/depth, controls, and display)
  • Applying core applications of POCUS
  • Looking for common complaints such as DVT, cholelithiasis, kidney stones, and more
  • Explaining the procedure to patients, including risks and benefits

Why this should matter to residents: At the end of residency training, a family medicine resident should be able to know the indications, benefits, and limitations of POCUS (Patient Care); Assess anatomy, physiology, and pathology with POCUS (Medical Knowledge); Communicate the results of a POCUS scan to the patient/treatment team, and document the results appropriately in the medical record (Interpersonal and Communication Skills); Talk to the patient about the risks and benefits of POCUS, alternatives to POCUS, and obtain verbal consent prior to a POCUS scan (Professionalism); Utilize POCUS to decrease time to properly diagnose, decrease procedure complications, and expedite medical care (Systems-Based Practice).

DERM: SHAVE & PUNCH BIOPSY (45 minutes)

Patients commonly present with worrisome skin lesions during their primary care visit. Instead of referring them out for a biopsy, family physicians can maintain care continuity by performing this procedure in the clinic. 

Residents will learn and have practice in: 

  • Identifying skin lesions that warrant a skin biopsy
  • Understanding the difference between punch vs shave biopsies, including different sizes and indications for each
  • Preparing a sterile field and gathering instruments
  • Administering anesthesia and utilizing proper techniques for a punch/shave biopsy 
  • Explaining the procedure to patients, including at-home wound care

Why this should matter to residents: Skin biopsies fall into the “conditions of the skin” requirement for family medicine training. Under this curriculum guideline, a resident should be able to independently perform a skin or punch biopsy. In addition, resident’s should be able to provide compassionate and culturally appropriate care that recognizes the effect of skin problems on the patient. Residents should also be able to perform a history and physical examination appropriate for skin conditions, use descriptive terminology, and perform a skin cancer screening exam.

MSK/JOINT INJECTIONS (45 minutes)

One of the most common chief complaints that patients bring to family physicians is MSK-related issues/pain. Prior to referral to specialists, family physicians must complete a thorough physical exam, come up with various differential diagnoses, and consider if they can offer treatment in office.

Residents will learn and have practice in:

  • Overview of the most high yield common joint conditions in various setting, including a thorough physical exam, to come up with various differential diagnosis, and to identify “red flag” MSK injuries that require urgent referral
    • Volunteers may choose a few out of the below conditions (however, not limited to these): Adhesive capsulitis, subacromial impingement syndrome, lateral/medial epicondylitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, De Quervain Syndrome, trigger finger, wrist/hand osteoarthritis, greater trochanteric bursitis, hip osteoarthritis, knee osteoarthritis, plantar fasciitis, and morton neuroma
  • Understand how to explain procedures/obtain consent to various MSK-related treatments, including corticosteroid/hyaluronic acid injections, its efficacy/contraindications/common adverse effects (blood glucose, allergic reaction), timing/frequency of injections
  • Familiarize with the most common anatomical landmarks, terminology using the prepared models (shoulder, nee, elbow, and hand/wrist)

Why this should matter to residents: By the end of residency training, a family medicine resident should be able to identify common MSK injuries/conditions, common sports-related injuries and complications, office-based MSK procedures (Patient Care); identify normal and abnormal growth/development, injury prevention, appropriate exercise for all ages (Medical Knowledge); communicate and ensure understanding of MSK-related topics to individuals (Interpersonal and Communication Skills); coordinate care across healthcare system and ensure proper referral (Systems-Based Practice); understand the importance of diagnosing and treating MSK and sports medicine related injuries in the setting of family medicine (Professionalism).

Connect with your local CAFP chapter

Find fellow family physicians in your neighborhood.
MEET YOUR LOCAL CHAPTER
cafp@familydocs.org
(415) 345-8667
816 21st Street, Sacramento, CA 95811
© 2019-2022 California Academy of Family Physicians. All Rights Reserved.
link to FPPAC homepage
link to FMRevolution.org
link to AAFP website
linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram